Are You Living in Performance-Based Christianity?

Performance Based Living

A rejection mindset provides toxic alternatives to healthy spiritual living, one of them being a performance-based Christianity.

The rejection mindset promotes “law thinking,” where we hope for approval and acceptance based on how well we perform. The thoughts to “work harder” and “do more,” become an internal pressure. These are not inherently evil traits, but they can become that when they are more important than the person’s unconditional acceptance and love from God, where God accepts us because of His Son.

The lure comes that “works” will get them approval and acceptance. When works override being loved unconditionally, God’s design for life becomes spoiled.

At this stage, the problem is that rejection has infected the motives of a person. They are now unknowingly chasing after love and performing for it all along the way. Most of the time, they are not even aware of this motivation. They just feel a “drive” or “impulse” propelling them into their daily actions. Throughout this stage, rejection is subtly implanting counterfeit values. If you’re honest with yourself, you may find these rejection-based motives lurking within. People bound by the performance trap:

People bound by the performance trap:

  • Feel they have to earn the love and acceptance of others.
  • Base how they feel about themselves on how well they perform their daily duties. “If I don’t do well, I will not be loved.”
  • Spend a lot of time mulling over the worries or pressures of tomorrow and fear not doing well in whatever they do. “I will not be accepted or belong.”
  • Tend to strive and live in a works mentality, where situations fall back on their efforts.
  • Process their relationship with God in how they can do things to get His attention, versus learning to receive who He is and giving it out.
  • Take themselves and what they do too seriously, placing constant pressure on themselves. “I can’t deal with not performing well.”
  • Regularly feel the pressure weigh on them when helping others. The results rest on how they perform.
  • Spend a lot of time thinking about what others think of them. They over think how they come across to others.
  • Have this excessive need to be “successful” and become known for their accomplishments.
  • Are not comfortable with vulnerability and weakness.
  • Often ignore important relational and identity issues of the heart, usually just to keep going and moving. Remember, with performance, the “show must go on.” 

To gain more freedom over performance-based living, get your copy of “Exposing the Rejection Mindset” today.

Question: In what ways does performance-based thinking and living affect your walk with God? (Comment below) 

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Mark DeJesus has been equipping people in a full time capacity since 1995, serving in various roles, including, teaching people of all ages, communicating through music, authoring books, leading and mentoring. Mark's deepest love is his family; his wife Melissa, son Maximus and daughter Abigail. Mark is a teacher, author and mentor who uses many communication mediums, including the written word, a weekly radio podcast show and videos. His deepest call involves equipping people to live as overcomers. Through understanding inside out transformation, Mark's message involves getting to the root of issues that contribute to the breakdown of our relationships, our health and our day to day peace. He is passionately reaching his world with a transforming message of love, healing and freedom. Out of their own personal renewal, Mark and Melissa founded Turning Hearts Ministries, a ministry dedicated to inside out transformation. Mark also founded Transformed You, a communication platform for Mark’s teachings, writing and broadcasts that are designed to encourage people in their journey of transformation. Mark and Melissa currently live in Connecticut.

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